DragNet

DragNet: July 15 – 31, 2014

 

With facial recognition technology growing in popularity (think Facebook), companies like CV Dazzle are responding with creative solutions aimed at protecting privacy (and, for that matter, your face).

With facial recognition technology growing in popularity (think Facebook), companies like CV Dazzle are responding with creative solutions aimed at protecting privacy (and, for that matter, your face).

The second half of July kicked off with a post from Leopold Lambert. If you (like me) have been attending a wave of concerts this summer, you’ll certainly find Lambert’s piece on the use of sound as a weapon to be of interest. The typical rock concert reaches a max of about 107 decibels, whereas sonic weapons (including mosquitoes and long range acoustic devices) can reach 120 decibels and beyond. Used in the US for the first time by the Pittsburgh police department in 2009, Lambert presents the political implications of sound as a militarized tool.Speaking of “cruel and unusual punishment”, Judith Butler reviewed The Death Penalty Vol I for the London Review of Books this month. Butler outlines Jacques Derrida’s consideration of the death penalty, which pulls from a wealth of historical analyses. Derrida probes the rationale behind legal and non-legal violence, as well as whether the former can (or perhaps should?) be justified.

You know Anthropoliteia staff strive to provide our readers with the widest selection of policing topics. That’s precisely why we decided to expand again this month, adding Interrogations to our section listing. The series launched with Heath Cabot’s interview of William Garriot. Cabot (of AllegraLab fame) asks Garriot about the policing perspectives contained in his newest edited volume, Policing and Contemporary Governance. Topics covered include: global vs. local policing, conceptual vs. physical aspects of policing and the impact of ethnographic documentation of police by anthropologists. We recommend that you check out a similar interview of Cabot that was featured previously by our friends at AllegraLab.

We know you loved Jennie Simpson’s newest post in our Practicum series. In it, she recounts her discussion with Dr. Patricia San Antonio who works as an applied anthropologist for a consulting firm in Washington, DC. Read about what Dr. San Antonio brings to the criminal justice realm with her unique ethnographic perspective (and don’t miss her concluding tips for fellow “hybrid” members of the field). Special thanks to our friends at the American Anthropological Association for the share!

On a more serious note, Imtiaz Akhtar’s impassioned post about the problem of gang rape in India is a must read. Returning to the case in Uttar Pradesh as a starting point, Akhtar analyzes the prevalence of violence against women in his native country. He points to omissive and/or absent coverage by local and global media as well as an institutionalized tolerance as the main perpetuators of violence. Is there an answer for India? According to Murali Balaji of Huffington Post if there is, it won’t be an easy one.

It’s a man…it’s a woman…it’s…an unidentifiable person, dressed like a muppet? My award for the most bizarre post of the month goes to CVDazzle.com. The company is dedicated to developing “anti-facial recognition” tactics, or the “anti-face” as they refer to it. With facial recognition technology growing in popularity (think Facebook), companies like CV Dazzle are responding with creative solutions aimed at protecting privacy (and, for that matter, your face). Discover how they are using fashion and makeup to block facial recognition software. If nothing else, it’s a great excuse to start incorporating your favorite rave gear into your everyday look.

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