Conferences

Papers and Panels of Interest at the 2017 American Anthropological Association Meeting

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Once again, it is that very special time of year: The American Anthropological Association’s 116th Annual Meeting. This year in Washington, D.C.

As impassioned followers of this blog know, we like to curate a list of sessions and papers of interest to our readers.  This year we’ve created a Google Calendar, which you can find embedded below and import into your own.  Be sure to keep an eye on @anthropoliteia’s twitter feed as well, where you’ll find coverage of the #AmAnth2017 hashtag with which several participants will be live-tweeting sessions and other events.

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Conferences

Papers and Panels of Interest at the 2017 American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting

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We have big news. This year is the 73rd Annual meeting of the

American Society of Criminology. For the first time, Anthropoliteia is offering up a list of papers and panels to check out for anyone that finds themselves in The City of Brotherly Love.

As impassioned followers of this blog know, we like to curate a list of sessions and papers of interest to our readers. We’ve created a schedule, which can be found below.

Under each event is a URL that provides more details about participants and sub-topics.

Be sure to keep an eye on @anthropoliteia’s twitter feed as well, where you’ll find coverage of the #ASCPhilly hashtag with which several participants will be live-tweeting sessions and other events.

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Announcements

New book series, Police/Worlds: studies in security, crime and governance

When we started this blog over 8 years (!) ago, part of the motivation was that those of us working on issues of policing from within the discipline of anthropology felt relatively disjointed and in need of a common forum to figure out just where we could go with our research as a collective project.

One of the benefits of entering the “Associate Professor” stage of one’s career, I suppose, is that you get to start seeing some of your long term goals for the discipline take form: I’m happy to announce the launch of Police/Worlds: studies in security, crime and governance, a new monograph series for Cornell University Press edited by myself, Ilana Feldman, William Garriott and Sameena Mulla (all of whom will be familiar to dedicated readers of this blog).  Everyone involved with Police/Worlds is hoping that it become a forum in which new approaches to studying police can find space and talk to each other.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

Year-End Reflections on The 2016-17 Anthropoliteia BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project

Welcome to the last post of the 2016-2017 year of Anthropoliteia’s #BlackLivesMatter syllabus. We’ve invited all of the series contributors to offer their thoughts here as we reflect on the past year. We can’t thank all of the contributors enough— collectively, hours and hours of inspired labor and creativity went into the blog posts. The 32 weeks represent sustained efforts by thoughtful faculty who produced these contributions in the midst of their on-going duties of teaching, research, and the thousand other jobs that professors due that go uncounted.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 32: Christen Smith on Afro-paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Christen Smith generously responds to interview questions about her book, Afro-paradise.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 31: Adia Benton on Public Health, Ebola and Black Lives on Both Sides of the Atlantic

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Adia Benton discusses public health, Ebola, humanitarian aid, care, militarism, and evaluations of Black Lives on both sides of the Atlantic.

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I teach courses in African studies and global health that focus on political economy, history and power. No matter the course content, I find that I have to undergo and perform several kinds of (dis)orientations with students: together, we destabilize dominant frames for talking, writing and learning about the African continent (for example, how does ‘race’ matter there); we identify what is “critical” about “critical approaches” to public health and biomedicine; and we interrogate what it means to study and ultimately work in the fields of public health and medicine, as this professional terrain shifts on a tension that pits rhetorics and practices of safety and care against those of security and discipline. Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 30: Savannah Shange’s Key & Peele Mix Tape Because Laughter Keeps Us Honest

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Savannah Shange uses comedy sketches by Key and Peele to enrich classroom discussion around race, masculinity, racism, anti-blackness, and affect.

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In my undergraduate courses on race and racism at a PWI, my students were largely a self-selected, social justice-minded group who sought sanctuary from their apolitical, Continue reading

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