Announcements

VAP Position in the Anthropology of Crime and/or Security

Le Moyne College.  Due to a last minute vacancy, the Department of Anthropology, Criminology and Sociology invites applications for a one-year Visiting Assistant Professor with the possibility of renewal to begin fall, 2015. We seek a social scientist with a Ph.D. in anthropology (preferred), sociology, or a related discipline whose main teaching and research areas are in the study of crime and/or security studies. ABD’s will be considered. We have redesigned our criminology major in a more liberal arts direction. The applicant must be able to teach a criminological theory course and contribute to courses within our interdisciplinary criminology major. Other preferences are for those who can contribute to our anthropology curricula and/or to the globalization of our Core curriculum including courses that are interdisciplinary or receive our “Encountering Another Culture” or “diversity” designations. The courseload is seven sections per year (3-4).  The department makes every effort to work with faculty to keep preparations to a minimum.

Applications will be reviewed as they are received through June 10, 2015.

Interested candidates should visit our website at http://www.lemoyne.edu/employment and submit the following materials: a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, teaching philosophy, evidence of teaching experience and effectiveness, names of 3 references and contact information.

Le Moyne College is a diverse learning community that strives for academic excellence in the Catholic and Jesuit tradition through its comprehensive programs rooted in the liberal arts and sciences. Le Moyne College is an equal opportunity employer and encourages women, persons of color, and Jesuits to apply for employment.

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Announcements, Call for papers

CFP: Making Races, Breaking Cases: A dialogue on science and society in the U.S. criminal justice context

(This call for papers is for a panel to be held at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Denver this November.)

How do police “make” race? How do people experience racial bias as an element in police power? This panel initiates discussion of these questions among anthropologists from across the four fields, in dialogue with scholars from other disciplines. We bring together forensic anthropologists, forensic scientists, political and legal anthropologists, and scholars of information technology to describe, discuss and reflect upon the institutional dynamics of race-making and racial bias in the United States criminal justice system. Papers will be given on (a) the interface of biological science and racial discourse in the production of police evidence; (b) the ways in which communities speak back to and engage with police archival records and evidence; (c) the place of race in legal theory and courtroom reality; d) latent bias in perceptions of race and racism and its potential impact on investigations. By merging critical theory with a diverse array of data—from technology to biology—we aspire to frame an integrated research agenda to address two major issues 1) the multidimensional sources from which the current state of racial biases in the criminal justice institute have stemmed/are sustained, and 2) the (in)visible ways in which those who are policed experience these biases.

We are looking for 1-2 additional people to join this conversation. If you would be interested in contributing a paper to this panel, please send a paper abstract ideas to hughesc@illinois.edu before April 7.

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Dossiers

Policing an Occupied Legislature, Part Three: Throwing Police Under the Bus.

[Updated 2014/03/25]

Propaganda from a Taiwanese protest camp

Fig. 1. Propaganda from the protest camp regarding last night’s police action: “You go to sleep. When you awake, Taiwan is not the same”

“Police friends,” said the student with a microphone, speaking over the heads of people facing him to the riot troops massing in the street behind them, “We have a chance to make history tonight! Join with us! Show the autocratic Ma government that the people and police are united!”

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Dossiers

Policing an Occupied Legislature (part 2).

(Continued from part one)

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Fig. 1 A note reading “Everyone, police, thank you for your struggle” hangs on a barbed wire barricade.

An emphasis on unity between the police and the people has emerged as a core element in the struggle by Taiwanese protestors to control representations of their movement. Where the Presidential Office has sought to describe them as a “Violent Mob,” they have successfully asserted the peaceful qualities inherent in the sympathetic bond that stretches across the barricades, uniting them with the rank and file policemen called up to contain them.

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Dossiers

Policing an Occupied Legislature (or “Institutional memory will get you through a time of no constitution better than a constitution will get you through a time of no institutional memory”).

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“We are not enemies. We are allies that stand facing one another” (caption to a picture that is purportedly an expression of police attitudes towards the recent occupation of Taiwan’s legislature)

In the context of a loving relationship between consenting adults, it’s normal for police to get screwed from both sides. Taiwanese democracy is sometimes a strained marriage, however. Tensions are introduced to any enterprise of collective self-determination when the great power next door insists your state does not exist. The existential tensions of Taiwanese democracy are currently being expressed in a constitutional crisis.  Last Tuesday night, the unpopular president’s ham-fisted attempt to fudge the procedures involved in his party’s pursuit of economic integration with China blew up in his face. Dissident students (later joined by their professors, constitutional law scholars and, increasingly, the general public) occupied the legislative assembly to physically prevent the conclusion of a process that would have endowed an agreement concluded between legislatively unqualified bodies with the force of statutory law.

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Announcements

New website for the Policing Studies Forum in Hong Kong

Just a note to let everyone know that our little seminar group in Hong Kong is slowly but surely growing a vibrant intellectual community around the interdisciplinary discussion of policing. We now have entered the 21st century with our own WEBSITE (yay!). The address is http://www.policingstudiesforum.com. Tell your friends and colleagues! And drop me a line if you want to get on the mailing list.

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Announcements, Conferences

November & December Police Studies events in Hong Kong

The Policing Studies Forum has some events scheduled for the upcoming months. On the 13th of November, we will meet at the Hong Kong Police College to engage in a discussion of Allan Jiao’s controversial monograph The Police in Hong Kong (2007, University Press of America) moderated by Dr. Lawrence Ho of Lingnan University. And on the 11th of December we will meet to discuss Wayne Chan’s ongoing PHD research into community policing practices in Hong Kong. As always, anyone interested is invited to participate, drop me a line at jt dot martin at gmail dot com.

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