Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

Year-End Reflections on The 2016-17 Anthropoliteia BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project

Welcome to the last post of the 2016-2017 year of Anthropoliteia’s #BlackLivesMatter syllabus. We’ve invited all of the series contributors to offer their thoughts here as we reflect on the past year. We can’t thank all of the contributors enough— collectively, hours and hours of inspired labor and creativity went into the blog posts. The 32 weeks represent sustained efforts by thoughtful faculty who produced these contributions in the midst of their on-going duties of teaching, research, and the thousand other jobs that professors due that go uncounted.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 32: Christen Smith on Afro-paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Christen Smith generously responds to interview questions about her book, Afro-paradise.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 31: Adia Benton on Public Health, Ebola and Black Lives on Both Sides of the Atlantic

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Adia Benton discusses public health, Ebola, humanitarian aid, care, militarism, and evaluations of Black Lives on both sides of the Atlantic.

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I teach courses in African studies and global health that focus on political economy, history and power. No matter the course content, I find that I have to undergo and perform several kinds of (dis)orientations with students: together, we destabilize dominant frames for talking, writing and learning about the African continent (for example, how does ‘race’ matter there); we identify what is “critical” about “critical approaches” to public health and biomedicine; and we interrogate what it means to study and ultimately work in the fields of public health and medicine, as this professional terrain shifts on a tension that pits rhetorics and practices of safety and care against those of security and discipline. Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 30: Savannah Shange’s Key & Peele Mix Tape Because Laughter Keeps Us Honest

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Savannah Shange uses comedy sketches by Key and Peele to enrich classroom discussion around race, masculinity, racism, anti-blackness, and affect.

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In my undergraduate courses on race and racism at a PWI, my students were largely a self-selected, social justice-minded group who sought sanctuary from their apolitical, Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 29: Courtney Morris For Black Boys Who Look Blue

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Courtney Morris explores teaching vulnerability, the Body, and Black masculinity through the film Moonlight.

I’m not sure anymore
Just how it happened before
The places that I knew
Were sunny and blue
I can feel it deep inside
This black nigga’s pride
I have no fear when I say
And I say it every day:

 Every nigga is a star

Every nigga is a star

Who will deny that you and I and every nigga is a star?

-Boris Gardner

Moonlight opens with the rich and soulful strains of the Jamaican soul singer, Boris Gardner’s R&B classic, “Every Nigga is a Star” as Juan, a young man, slowly pulls up in a sky-blue Cadillac to a derelict apartment building in Miami. Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 28: Michelle Stewart, Towards Accomplices not Allies—in the Classroom and the Streets

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Michelle Stewart, contributes with a piece titled, Towards Accomplices not Allies—in the classroom and the streets. 
 

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Syllabus is pausing to breath, and so should you.

We’ve been going for 26 weeks! Those of us in the classroom are getting to the parts of the semester that are very tricky to maneuver. Why is this semester trying to end us? But we will rally, persist and prevail. That means that the syllabus is taking a beat this week, but we should be back on soon. The plan is to finish the semester with some interesting posts to broaden our perspectives and prepare us for anything the classroom might throw at us. It’s a good time to get caught up on your reading (syllabus-related or otherwise). Rest assured. We will be back soon.

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