Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 29: Courtney Morris For Black Boys Who Look Blue

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Courtney Morris explores teaching vulnerability, the Body, and Black masculinity through the film Moonlight.

I’m not sure anymore
Just how it happened before
The places that I knew
Were sunny and blue
I can feel it deep inside
This black nigga’s pride
I have no fear when I say
And I say it every day:

 Every nigga is a star

Every nigga is a star

Who will deny that you and I and every nigga is a star?

-Boris Gardner

Moonlight opens with the rich and soulful strains of the Jamaican soul singer, Boris Gardner’s R&B classic, “Every Nigga is a Star” as Juan, a young man, slowly pulls up in a sky-blue Cadillac to a derelict apartment building in Miami. Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus Project, Week 19: Anne Galvin on Reflexivity and the White Anthropologist

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this entry,  Anne Galvin discusses how teaching with memoir introduces many voices and points of view in her classroom. 

brother-i-am-dying

I attended graduate school in the 1990s and, like many anthropologists in training, spent much of my coursework considering questions of “positionality.”  At the time, taking stock of anthropology’s relationship to colonial projects, as well as our own sometimes privileged positions and biases, shaped disciplinary debates and new methodologies.  Reflexivity – the practice of being transparent about one’s own situation and possible bias – was one way anthropologists responded to the problem of position. It turns out these considerations are far from academic in 2017 as we work to build more effective engagements between anthropologists and movements for racial justice and develop inclusive classroom pedagogies. Continue reading

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