Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

Year-End Reflections on The 2016-17 Anthropoliteia BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project

Welcome to the last post of the 2016-2017 year of Anthropoliteia’s #BlackLivesMatter syllabus. We’ve invited all of the series contributors to offer their thoughts here as we reflect on the past year. We can’t thank all of the contributors enough— collectively, hours and hours of inspired labor and creativity went into the blog posts. The 32 weeks represent sustained efforts by thoughtful faculty who produced these contributions in the midst of their on-going duties of teaching, research, and the thousand other jobs that professors due that go uncounted.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project, Pedagogy

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 26: Sameena Mulla on Missing Black Girls and Women

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Sameena Mulla notes contributions to the recent discussions about missing black girls (with thanks to Leslie Wingard).

SayHerNameIf you take anything away from this post, it should be to read Eve Dunbar’s article, “On Gwendolyn Brooks and Disappearing Black Girls.” Dunbar writes:

In Washington, DC, the city currently home to America’s least popular president ever, the mainstream media “broke” the story that a rash of black girls had gone missing. Social networking platforms circulated hashtags and headlines speculating the girls had been abducted and forced into sex work. Others worried the girls were dead. The police countered all theories by assuring local and national worriers that these missing black girls were merely runaways. Continue reading

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus, Week 15: Ashanté Reese on Zora Neale Hurston and Refusing One Dimensional Blackness

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to relaunch the second semester of an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this entry, Ashanté Reese discusses teaching from Zora Neale Hurston’s writings to explore many dimensions of blackness.

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, Week 10: Sameena Mulla on AAA2016

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to present the latest entry in on ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed. In this entry, Sameena Mulla tells you where we can find each other at the annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association which begin on Wednesday, November 16 in Minneapolis, MN.
 

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