Tip of the Cap

Prisoners of Culture

This piece is a little different from previous iterations of “Tip of The Cap.”  Earlier entries into this series were written by published scholars, and they were written with an eye to filling in the blanks about how some classic works of criminology, sociology, anthropology, etc. shaped that work.  Here at Anthropoliteia we’re rebooting the series, but with a bit of a broader scope: we’re widening the net to include multiple formats and forms of inspiration.  The new “Tip of the Cap” will include pieces of various genres that have been influenced by, or are working through, the broader bibliography that’s now accruing for work on anthropology, security, crime and policing.  This short absurdist fiction piece, “Prisoners of Culture” comes to us from Johns Hopkins University undergraduate Andy Ramirez.  If you have a short piece that you think would fit well in the new rebooted series, send us an email at anthropoliteia@gmail.com with “Tip of the Cap” in the subject header.
 

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Black Lives Matter Syllabus Project

The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatter Syllabus Project, Week 25: Kevin G. Karpiak on the banality of police violence

The editors of Anthropoliteia are happy to continue an ongoing series The Anthropoliteia #BlackLivesMatterSyllabus Project, which will mobilize anthropological work as a pedagogical exercise addressing the confluence of race, policing and justice. You can see a growing bibliography of resources via our Mendeley feed.  In this post, Kevin G. Karpiak discusses the banality of police violence. 
 

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#Ferguson & Elsewhere

Policing as a Well-Protected Craft

The editors of Anthropoliteia would like to welcome Peter K. Manning with the latest entry in our developing forum #Ferguson & Elsewhere
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