DragNet

DragNet: October 21 – November 3, 2014

It is often the data that is not there that reveals what is most important. I was reminded of this fact again by Scott Vollum's post, The Ghost of the Condemned: What the Death Penalty Leaves Behind, Captured in a Snapshot

It is often the data that is not there that reveals what is most important. I was reminded of this fact again by Scott Vollum’s post, The Ghost of the Condemned: What the Death Penalty Leaves Behind, Captured in a Snapshot

Anthropoliteia rang in the new month with Malcolm Sparrow’s post, Managing the Boundary Between Public and Private Policing. Originally featured by the Centre of Criminology’s Library Blog, Sparrow reflects on the practical and political ramifications of integrating the private security field with local law enforcement. The fact that private security industries spend nearly twice the amount ($100 billion) of their local law enforcement colleagues each year raises questions about whether or not the “interests of private parties” can ever fully “align with public interests.”

We also revisited the theme of excessive force this month, sharing Nicole Flatow‘s post on ThinkProgress. In Seattle Cops Bring Lawsuit Claiming They Have a Constitutional Right to Use Excessive ForceFlatow recounts the latest developments about the ongoing lawsuit against Seattle officers. Should officers be excused from attempts to de-escalate situations with the public before employing more extreme measures of force? Weigh in on the discussion.

Knowing my love for sharing fellow graduate research, I must highlight a noteworthy post from Deniz Daser of Rutgers University. Children in the Court Deportation Proceedings for the Child Migrants of the Northern Triangle offers a glimpse into Daser’s Ph.D. research of her ethnographic fieldwork with Honduran migrant workers employed by the building trade in New Orleans.

A favorite professor of mine once reflected that it is “often the data that is not there that reveals what is most important.” I was reminded again of this fact by Scott Vollum‘s post, The Ghost of the Condemned: What the Death Penalty Leaves Behind, Captured in a Snapshot. Featured in Uprooting CriminologyVollum’s words remind us of the power of liminality and transient spaces. To say a picture is worth 1,000 words does not do full justice to the power of this post.

My award for most genuine post of the month goes to Cherie Dawson-Edwards‘ Community as the Criminal Justice Laboratory. I found myself shouting, “Yeah!” and “Right on!” at least four or five times throughout this short but to-the-point post. Read about Cherie’s quest to promote enthusiasm for the “scholarship-based counterpart” of community engaged teaching.

David Thompson regaled us with the newest developments in all things security, crime, policing and the law this month. Anthropoliteia featured the newest installation of In the Journals, recapping the best in bi-monthly academic publications.

Attending the American Society of Criminology Conference later this month? If you haven’t gotten enough of all things ASC from recent university-mandated practice presentations, you’ll definitely want to check out Don Kurtz and Travis Linnemann‘s piece, Time is a Flat Dircle: Police Narratives and Storytelling which will be featured Thursday, November 20th at the event.

Finally, Anthropoliteia hooked you up again this month by creating yet another regular feature, Commentary & Forums. The first post, Thinking About Tina Fontaine Murder(s): The role of the Police, Inquiries and Settlers in Canada went live October 31; written by our own Michelle Stewart. Stay tuned for future anthropology of policing posts approached from a settler-state perspective.

Did I miss something? No worries- it does happen on occasion. If you have any suggestions for DragNet, or if you want to call attention to a specific blog or article, send an email to anthropoliteia@gmail.com with the words “DragNet” in the subject header and I’ll get on it!
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